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TV5 Monde Afrique to set up a second satellite signal and terrestrial signals in Togo and Ghana for 2011

“TV5 Monde Afrique” is one of the leading pan-African TV network in particular across francophone Africa. TV5 Monde transmits to 210 million households globally on a weekly basis. 22 million of these households are on the African continent. Denise Epoté, Director de TV5 Monde Afrique talked to Sylvain Beletre about its plans for 2011.

 “TV5 Monde will set up a second satellite signal in East Africa set on Jo’burg’s time to suit local watching time. Right now, TV5 Monde only broadcasts a single satellite signal in Africa, set up on Dakar time (TU0)” said Denise.

The global television network, providing several channels of French language programming is also broadcast via nine terrestrial transmission signals: “A tenth wireless broadcast signal is also going to be set up in Togo, around Lomé. The signal should be operational from the 20th December. There is also a possibility that the channel will get broadcast via terrestrial transmission in Ghana during 2011”, added Denise. The decision will fall under the state's authorities.

(Watch the full interview (in French) here: TV5 Monde Afrique - 2011 projects - http://www.youtube.com/user/BalancingActAfrica#p/a/u/1/bZlQYm4UUwQ )

 

“Next year, TV5 Monde will continue to provide translation of its main programmes from French to English (and several other languages including Arabic) – about 30 hours of programmes are sub-titled each week. Education is also on the agenda, and the network has set up partnerships with several local schools in Africa. Globally, the station provides educational support to 42,000 teachers.

In a growing competitive market, the TV network has marketed its channel extensively in Africa through various campaigns and events’ partnerships to grow its local audience.

The company will also carry on supporting local African producers and film makers. Recent examples include "un homme qui cri" from Mahamat-Saleh Haroun (Chad), co-financed by TV5 Monde which made it to the Cannes’ International Film Festival in 2010 (Jury’s prize), or the successful “Afrique(s), une autre histoire du XXe siècle” (Africa, another history of the XXth. Cent.), a documentary series from Elikia M’Bokolo, Philippe Sainteny, Alain Ferrari, coproduced by TV5.

When asked about supporting African productions, Denis Epoté advises young film makers to contact “La Francophonie” among other entities to finance their upcoming audiovisual content.

http://www.youtube.com/user/BalancingActAfrica#p/u/3/Yz2PEIFf__g

On the web front, TV5 has largely invested in its web portal (8.5 M visits/month with the mobile version), including a section dedicated to Africa (http://www.tv5.org/TV5Site/afrique/). This African portal has received two prizes at the Web TV Festival of “La Rochelle” back in May 2010. Denise told us that the African WebTV already gets 180,000 visits/month and 280,000 pages views/month on average (and growing) since 25 may 2010 when the webTV was launched. Web users can access replays and VOD. The portal is packed with news, blogs, documentaries, series, films, reports on Africa, a section on the 50th anniversary of African independence, country profiles, a French dictionary, an African film encyclopaedia and more.  Additionally, TV5 Monde has set up a mobile app. (m.tv5monde.com) and an iPhone app.

How is the TV5 Monde financed? Today, explained Denise, “four countries maintain the channel network: France, Belgium, Switzerland and Canada”. The partnership making up the TV5Monde consortium are Arte (itself a consortium of Franco-German broadcasters), France Télévisions, Institut national de l'audiovisuel, Radio-Canada, Télé-Québec, RTBF and TSR. This consortium owns 51% of the service, while the other share is owned by “Société de l'audiovisuel extérieur de la France”, a holding company that manages France's international broadcasting services. Two African countries are contributing to the channel: Burkina Faso and Senegal. Financial contribution from other African countries would insure further visibility and continuity on the African continent.

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