CNBC Africa scoops prized Television Award

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On 19 May 2011, CNBC Africa, Africa’s first 24-hour business news television channel, scooped the coveted Audio-visual Award at the Sanlam for Excellence in Financial Journalism Awards, beating more established contenders in the South African television environment.

CNBC Africa senior journalist Chris Bishop, was announced as a winner in the Sanlam Awards for Excellence in Financial Journalism in the Audio-visual category at a ceremony in Johannesburg last night. He shared the prize with former CNBC Africa colleague Suzanne Beukes.

The annual Sanlam Awards were introduced in 1974 to acknowledge the indispensable role of financial journalism in society and to promote the high standards required of financial journalists. This year, the competition attracted 109 entries from 70 journalists representing 25 different publications, online news services and radio and television stations.

CNBC Africa Chief Editor, Godfrey Mutizwa says: "The recognition of CNBC Africa is a continuing testament of the tireless work we are putting in to make the channel the leading voice for African business and markets."

Applicants were required to submit five stories for entries in the Audio-visual Category and for Bishop these included:

The rise of the gold price – a look behind the spike in the price of the precious metal.

Resource Nationalism – How Africans are demanding more value for their resources.

The flight to Georgia – How South African farmers are leaving for the former Soviet republic.

The Mandela Factor – The story behind Nelson Mandela’s conversion to capitalism.

How good is greed? – The influence of the movie Wall Street on a generation of financial wizards.

Bishop joined CNBC Africa in 2009 and has hosted shows such as Open Exchange and Power Lunch. In 2010, he also produced and compiled a 3-Part documentary titled ‘Liliesleaf: The Untold Story’. Bishop was previously honoured with the Sir David Beattie Award for excellence in Journalism for uncovering a plot to assassinate the Queen of England during a royal tour.